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May 29

In this article I will go through the steps for creating and structuring a Windows Phone 7 app in Visual Studio 2010. In an earlier article I did some sketching and analysing for the PinCodeKeeper app and I will now start developing this application.

I will not go through the steps for installing Windows Phone Developer tools, if you have not all ready installed these tools have a look at this article: Installing Windows Phone Developer Tools. I am using Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with the latest Windows Phone Developer Tools installed.

Create a Windows Phone project

In Visual Studio 2010 select “New project” –> “Silverlight for Windows Phone” –> “Windows Phone Application”. Then give the project a name and click “OK”, I named my project “PinCodeKeeper”.

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May 29

When starting developing a new mobile app it is always tempting to jump directly to your favourite IDE and start developing, but do yourself a favour and spend a few minutes planing what you are going to develop. This will most likely save you a lot of time later on.

I’m creating a very simple Windows Phone 7 app called PinCodeKeeper and as the name states this application will keep your pin codes.

Sketching

It’s always a good idea to start sketching the wire frames for your application. I like to just make some easy and not very detailed wire frames covering the most important parts of the application. The most important at this phase is to identify the functionality you want the app to contain. These sketches are also very good to use when discussing the app with potential users/customers.

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Feb 13

This is the last part in a series of four and will step by step explain how to use WCF services to access SQL Azure Database from Windows Phone 7 app. As an example I will develop a Windows Phone app where the user can create an account and later on log in to the account by user name and password. The accounts are saved in SQL Azure and I am using WCF for communication between the WP7 app and SQL Azure Database.

The book Beginning Windows Phone 7 Development has a very detailed chapter about using SQL Azure Database.

Part 1: Signing up to Windows Azure and create your SQL Azure Database

Part 2: Creating a cloud service (WCF service) to connect to the SQL Azure Database

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Feb 13

This is part three in a series of four and will step by step explain how to use WCF services to access SQL Azure Database from Windows Phone 7 app. As an example I will develop a Windows Phone app where the user can create an account and later on log in to the account by user name and password. The accounts are saved in SQL Azure and I am using WCF for communication between the WP7 app and SQL Azure Database.

The book Beginning Windows Phone 7 Development has a very detailed chapter about using SQL Azure Database.

Part 1: Signing up to Windows Azure and create your SQL Azure Database

Part 2: Creating a cloud service (WCF service) to connect to the SQL Azure Database

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Feb 13

This is part two in a series of four and will step by step explain how to use WCF services to access SQL Azure Database from Windows Phone 7 app. As an example I will develop a Windows Phone app where the user can create an account and later on log in to the account by user name and password. The accounts are saved in SQL Azure and I am using WCF for communication between the WP7 app and SQL Azure Database.

The book Beginning Windows Phone 7 Development has a very detailed chapter about using SQL Azure Database.

Part 1: Signing up to Windows Azure and create your SQL Azure Database

Part 2: Creating a cloud service (WCF service) to connect to the SQL Azure Database

Continue reading »

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Feb 13

This is part one in a series of four and will step by step explain how to use WCF services to access SQL Azure Database from Windows Phone 7 app. As an example I will develop a Windows Phone app where the user can create an account and later on log in to the account by user name and password. The accounts are saved in SQL Azure and I am using WCF for communication between the WP7 app and SQL Azure Database.

The book Beginning Windows Phone 7 Development has a very detailed chapter about using SQL Azure Database.

Part 1: Signing up to Windows Azure and create your SQL Azure Database

Continue reading »

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Feb 04

I have developed a plugin for WordPress that is called DiveBook with the purpose of logging dives. I have now had it published at WordPress Plugin Directory for a while as a beta version. In this post I will talk about bugs and issues I experienced during the beta period and how I solved them.

Unexpected output during activation

The first issue I got was that when activating the plugin the following error message were displayed

The plugin generated 2 characters of unexpected output during activation. If you notice “headers already sent” messages, problems with syndication feeds or other issues, try deactivating or removing this plugin

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Jan 21

As a solution architect I often get thrown into projects with a lot of legacy code and little or outdated documentation. My mandate is to suggest architectural changes that will reduce maintenance costs and ease further development. The first thing I focus on is to get an overview of the system and how it is structured with modules, components and classes. I have found that the best way to get this overview is to create a light weight UML class diagram. In this post I will show you how I prefer to create light weight UML class diagrams.

To start with I will explain what I mean by light weight UML class diagrams.

I want the diagrams to be easy to read and understand and I try to find the balance where the diagram is so light that non-technical persons (like product owner and project manager) understands it, but still it is technical enough so technical persons (like developers and architects) finds it useful.

I only use a few of the UML class diagram symbols: Continue reading »

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Aug 06

When you are planning and also managing a software project there are hundreds (if not thousands) of different software products you can use to utilize and enhance your processes. I often ask my self if these products are really helping me or if they are actually more an obstacle. My largest issue with using software for all your process is that the software forces you to think and work in a manner that suites the software. Your mindset will quickly be limited to the available functionality.

We have all kind of different software that is widely used in software projects:

Project documents

Every software projects have documents and most likely tons of them. You have specification docs, system docs, design docs, architecture docs and other documents describing the system. These are often large documents written in word and takes a lot of time to keep updated. What you often see is that at one point in the project you just give up having all these documents updated with changes and adjustments.

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Jul 02

When planning/starting a software project (probably other projects as well) you are often provided a list with requirements written by the customer. It is now your job and responsibility that you meet all the requirements. Not only do you need to meet the requirements you also need to meet the requirements in a manner so that the customer agrees that the requirements are met. How can you increase the possibilities for this to happen?

First you need to make sure that you and the customer understand the requirements equally. It is quite easy to interpret the requirements, the hard part is to interpret the requirements correctly (according to the customer). What you need to do is to systematic go through each requirement and describe, with your own words, the functionality you associate with the given requirement. When this is done you must present your functional description to the customer and make sure that you both have the same and good understanding of the requirements. This might be time consuming, but it is worth the time.

Requirement interpret gone bad

You have now ensured that you understand your customer’s needs and you know what functionality the customer expect to get delivered. These needs and functionality will naturally change during the project and that is OK, you have a great fundamental for absorbing and acting on changes when you have a clear view of the original proposed functionality.

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